© Created by Christian Cozzolino design
The ketogenic diet in the therapy of drug-resistant epilepsy Epilepsy is a central nervous system disease and is characterized by the persistent recurrence of sudden convulsive seizures that often occur without warning and with involuntary, abrupt and uncontrolled movements of the muscles, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness, leading to a global deterioration. This disease is also considered a social problem, both for the intrinsic severity of the disease and for the repercussions on the young patients’ families. The use of ketogenic diet, as a drug-resistant epilepsy therapy, dates back to the 20s of last century. In fact, W. G Lennox in his book "Epilepsy and related disorders" reports the case of a wealthy lawyer from New York whose son had multi-daily crises that could not be controlled with the medicines on the market in 1920. The family turned to Hugh Conklin, lover of natural methods. He believed he could treat the disease praying and fasting. The child's seizures improved significantly in the weeks of the "water-based diet", prompting parents to seek an alternative but equally effective solution; the boy's uncle, a professor of paediatrics, obtained the help of Dr. Howland and his colleagues at John Hopkins in Baltimore where they began the study of the metabolic modifications of the fasting organism. Thus the ketogenic diet was developed, the use of this innovative therapy was included in almost all the texts on childhood epilepsy and numerous American Centres organized new diet therapy programs. From 1921 onwards (Wilder "The Effect of Ketonemia on the Course of Epilepsy", Mayo Clinic Bull. 2: 307, 1921) the scientific work on the use of the ketogenic diet as therapy for epilepsy multiplied. After this initial enthusiasm, in the 1940s and 1950s, the interest in dieting rapidly waned; only from the 70s it was rediscovered and is currently used as a therapy in drug-resistant epilepsy in most countries of the world. In recent years, numerous scientific papers have been published on the use of this diet by researchers from all 5 continents and, especially in English-speaking countries, the support from associations of patients and families is very consistent and contributes to the diffusion and understanding of the diet. The guidelines suggest that the ketogenic diet should be considered when at least 3-4 attempts of drug treatment have failed. In this pathology, the ketogenic diet offers an effective control of epileptic seizures by providing the brain with an essential "fuel", represented by ketogenic bodies, for brain metabolic activity. The debate on whether or not there are specific forms that can benefit the most from ketogenic therapy still remains open at international level: currently everyone focuses their interest on drug- resistant forms. Epilepsy is one of the most widespread neurological disease ever existed with 65 million patients, of which only 6 million in Europe. In 70% of cases they are within 12 years old, with possible negative consequences on psychomotor development and social repercussions. In Italy there are 500.000 children with epilepsy, of which over 40% are drug resistant, and it is estimated that over 30.000 new cases are diagnosed each year, 60% of which are in childhood. Very often it is difficult to identify the cause of the pathology and therefore determine the best therapy. Epilepsy is the main neurological disease in children. NUTRITIONAL ADVICE Unfortunately, the culture of epilepsy nutritional care through ketogenic diet is still scarcely known in Italy and this in contrast with the international panorama, where this approach is much more diffused. Another important aspect is the problem of the palatability of food, especially compared to a typical Italian Mediterranean diet, this is an even more evident problem in subjects who must maintain this diet for many years (for example in the pathology of glucose transporter deficiency). To facilitate the maintenance of a ketogenic diet, ketogenic foods have been created, substitutes for ready-made starchy food, which allows families to vary the recipes, offering a strategy that improves compliance respecting the diet and helping maintaining metabolic control over time and respecting the diet, otherwise monotonous and more complex to follow. The health team will create a personalized diet for each patient based on the subject's energy needs and dietary habits. The ketogenic diet is a non-pharmacological treatment indicated in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and in those patients in whom antiepileptic drugs cause serious effects. (Prof. Antonio Paoli - Università degli Studi di Padova)
The carbohydrate replacement products range of Le Gamberi Keto Plus represents an important nutritional response for ketogenic diet for drug-resistant epilepsy and allows you to follow the ketogenic diet in an easy way without giving up traditional eating habits.
Foods for Special Medical Purposes Le Gamberi Keto Plus

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The ketogenic diet in the therapy of drug-resistant epilepsy Epilepsy is a central nervous system disease and is characterized by the persistent recurrence of sudden convulsive seizures that often occur without warning and with involuntary, abrupt and uncontrolled movements of the muscles, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness, leading to a global deterioration. This disease is also considered a social problem, both for the intrinsic severity of the disease and for the repercussions on the young patients’ families. The use of ketogenic diet, as a drug-resistant epilepsy therapy, dates back to the 20s of last century. In fact, W. G Lennox in his book "Epilepsy and related disorders" reports the case of a wealthy lawyer from New York whose son had multi-daily crises that could not be controlled with the medicines on the market in 1920. The family turned to Hugh Conklin, lover of natural methods. He believed he could treat the disease praying and fasting. The child's seizures improved significantly in the weeks of the "water-based diet", prompting parents to seek an alternative but equally effective solution; the boy's uncle, a professor of paediatrics, obtained the help of Dr. Howland and his colleagues at John Hopkins in Baltimore where they began the study of the metabolic modifications of the fasting organism. Thus the ketogenic diet was developed, the use of this innovative therapy was included in almost all the texts on childhood epilepsy and numerous American Centres organized new diet therapy programs. From 1921 onwards (Wilder "The Effect of Ketonemia on the Course of Epilepsy", Mayo Clinic Bull. 2: 307, 1921) the scientific work on the use of the ketogenic diet as therapy for epilepsy multiplied. After this initial enthusiasm, in the 1940s and 1950s, the interest in dieting rapidly waned; only from the 70s it was rediscovered and is currently used as a therapy in drug-resistant epilepsy in most countries of the world. In recent years, numerous scientific papers have been published on the use of this diet by researchers from all 5 continents and, especially in English-speaking countries, the support from associations of patients and families is very consistent and contributes to the diffusion and understanding of the diet. The guidelines suggest that the ketogenic diet should be considered when at least 3-4 attempts of drug treatment have failed. In this pathology, the ketogenic diet offers an effective control of epileptic seizures by providing the brain with an essential "fuel", represented by ketogenic bodies, for brain metabolic activity. The debate on whether or not there are specific forms that can benefit the most from ketogenic therapy still remains open at international level: currently everyone focuses their interest on drug-resistant forms. Epilepsy is one of the most widespread neurological disease ever existed with 65 million patients, of which only 6 million in Europe. In 70% of cases they are within 12 years old, with possible negative consequences on psychomotor development and social repercussions. In Italy there are 500.000 children with epilepsy, of which over 40% are drug resistant, and it is estimated that over 30.000 new cases are diagnosed each year, 60% of which are in childhood. Very often it is difficult to identify the cause of the pathology and therefore determine the best therapy. Epilepsy is the main neurological disease in children. NUTRITIONAL ADVICE Unfortunately, the culture of epilepsy nutritional care through ketogenic diet is still scarcely known in Italy and this in contrast with the international panorama, where this approach is much more diffused. Another important aspect is the problem of the palatability of food, especially compared to a typical Italian Mediterranean diet, this is an even more evident problem in subjects who must maintain this diet for many years (for example in the pathology of glucose transporter deficiency). To facilitate the maintenance of a ketogenic diet, ketogenic foods have been created, substitutes for ready-made starchy food, which allows families to vary the recipes, offering a strategy that improves compliance respecting the diet and helping maintaining metabolic control over time and respecting the diet, otherwise monotonous and more complex to follow. The health team will create a personalized diet for each patient based on the subject's energy needs and dietary habits. The ketogenic diet is a non-pharmacological treatment indicated in patients with drug- resistant epilepsy and in those patients in whom antiepileptic drugs cause serious effects. (Prof. Antonio Paoli - Università degli Studi di Padova)
The carbohydrate replacement products range of Le Gamberi Keto Plus represents an important nutritional response for ketogenic diet for drug-resistant epilepsy and allows you to follow the ketogenic diet in an easy way without giving up traditional eating habits.
Foods for Special Medical Purposes Le Gamberi Keto Plus
© Created by Christian Cozzolino design
© Created by Christian Cozzolino design
The ketogenic diet in the therapy of drug-resistant epilepsy Epilepsy is a central nervous system disease and is characterized by the persistent recurrence of sudden convulsive seizures that often occur without warning and with involuntary, abrupt and uncontrolled movements of the muscles, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness, leading to a global deterioration. This disease is also considered a social problem, both for the intrinsic severity of the disease and for the repercussions on the young patients’ families. The use of ketogenic diet, as a drug-resistant epilepsy therapy, dates back to the 20s of last century. In fact, W. G Lennox in his book "Epilepsy and related disorders" reports the case of a wealthy lawyer from New York whose son had multi-daily crises that could not be controlled with the medicines on the market in 1920. The family turned to Hugh Conklin, lover of natural methods. He believed he could treat the disease praying and fasting. The child's seizures improved significantly in the weeks of the "water-based diet", prompting parents to seek an alternative but equally effective solution; the boy's uncle, a professor of paediatrics, obtained the help of Dr. Howland and his colleagues at John Hopkins in Baltimore where they began the study of the metabolic modifications of the fasting organism. Thus the ketogenic diet was developed, the use of this innovative therapy was included in almost all the texts on childhood epilepsy and numerous American Centres organized new diet therapy programs. From 1921 onwards (Wilder "The Effect of Ketonemia on the Course of Epilepsy", Mayo Clinic Bull. 2: 307, 1921) the scientific work on the use of the ketogenic diet as therapy for epilepsy multiplied. After this initial enthusiasm, in the 1940s and 1950s, the interest in dieting rapidly waned; only from the 70s it was rediscovered and is currently used as a therapy in drug-resistant epilepsy in most countries of the world. In recent years, numerous scientific papers have been published on the use of this diet by researchers from all 5 continents and, especially in English-speaking countries, the support from associations of patients and families is very consistent and contributes to the diffusion and understanding of the diet. The guidelines suggest that the ketogenic diet should be considered when at least 3-4 attempts of drug treatment have failed. In this pathology, the ketogenic diet offers an effective control of epileptic seizures by providing the brain with an essential "fuel", represented by ketogenic bodies, for brain metabolic activity. The debate on whether or not there are specific forms that can benefit the most from ketogenic therapy still remains open at international level: currently everyone focuses their interest on drug-resistant forms. Epilepsy is one of the most widespread neurological disease ever existed with 65 million patients, of which only 6 million in Europe. In 70% of cases they are within 12 years old, with possible negative consequences on psychomotor development and social repercussions. In Italy there are 500.000 children with epilepsy, of which over 40% are drug resistant, and it is estimated that over 30.000 new cases are diagnosed each year, 60% of which are in childhood. Very often it is difficult to identify the cause of the pathology and therefore determine the best therapy. Epilepsy is the main neurological disease in children. NUTRITIONAL ADVICE Unfortunately, the culture of epilepsy nutritional care through ketogenic diet is still scarcely known in Italy and this in contrast with the international panorama, where this approach is much more diffused. Another important aspect is the problem of the palatability of food, especially compared to a typical Italian Mediterranean diet, this is an even more evident problem in subjects who must maintain this diet for many years (for example in the pathology of glucose transporter deficiency). To facilitate the maintenance of a ketogenic diet, ketogenic foods have been created, substitutes for ready-made starchy food, which allows families to vary the recipes, offering a strategy that improves compliance respecting the diet and helping maintaining metabolic control over time and respecting the diet, otherwise monotonous and more complex to follow. The health team will create a personalized diet for each patient based on the subject's energy needs and dietary habits. The ketogenic diet is a non-pharmacological treatment indicated in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and in those patients in whom antiepileptic drugs cause serious effects. (Prof. Antonio Paoli - Università degli Studi di Padova)
The carbohydrate replacement products range of Le Gamberi Keto Plus represents an important nutritional response for ketogenic diet for drug- resistant epilepsy and allows you to follow the ketogenic diet in an easy way without giving up traditional eating habits.
Foods for Special Medical Purposes Le Gamberi Keto Plus